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trial in the history of the united states. that's my conclusion after studying it as close as i could. and that's the report of my book. i try to explain in my book why i believe that to be true, and i will try to give you a suggestion on what i believe that to be true in my remarks here tonight. john brown's trial was the first trial in the history of the united states to receive massive attention from national media. it was the first trial in which a defendant was executed for treason against a state, as opposed to treason against the united states. it was the first trial in which an accused defendant appealed to a higher law to justify violent crimes. it was a trial that involved more than just a determination of an individuals guilt or innocence, according to laws laid down in statute books and in case reports. it was a trial that pitted two starkly different moral visions against each other. one of these visions defended the institution of chattel slavery as traditional, necessary, just and worthy of protection from outside interference. particularly, from the outside interferenc
is to understand the circumstances that are going on right now in terms of the compromise of the united states sovereignty by what's happening to the dollar with deficits budget to be positive so the last third of this book is solutions. what we can do as a subtitle says fighting new world order, surviving the global depression and preserving u.s. sovereignty. so the themes of this book at the last third or to give solutions and call to action for how we can organize our lives, how we can organize politically in order to fight back to say no to a global new deal. now, to get everyone's mind of around the idea of america for sale, i like to start at this way. we currently have page 24 of the book and document we have got about a 65.5 trillion what the t negative net worth. now what that means, that is according to the department treasury's own statistics. once a year the deeper and the treasury does a gap accounting and david walker, who was the head of the government accountability office actually resigned in 2008 it went on the week up to our alarming people, telling people essentially that i
effect. a recent study by our national academy of sciences found that here in the united states burning fossil fuels leads to almost 120 billion dollars in health costs a year. most of those costs are premature deaths, and we know that the cost in human lives can be even higher in countries we merging economies that have fewer resources to improve air quality. for all of these reasons, president obama and i understand that we cannot wait any longer to act. president obama has made it clear that he's committed to passing comprehensive energy and climate legislation that will create millions of new jobs and secure clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america. but in the meantime, we're looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at a white house stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to invest
to terrorist organizations, that directly threaten the security of the united states, it is essential that our government agencies are sharing information about such individuals. what happens been in the media these last days about major hasan and his behavior, if determined to be true, is very disturbing. such allegations as justifying suicide bombing on the internet, lecturing fellow soldiers using jihadist rhetoric, warning about adverse events if muslims were not allowed to leave military service, repeatedly seeking counsel from a radical islamic imam with well-known ties to al-qaeda. attempting to convert some of his patients who were suffering from stress disorders to his distorted view of islam and finally, was the fbi sharing with the army what it knew about hasan and aulaqi and was the army sharing what it knew about hasan with the fbi? while these patterns are preliminary and will be confirmed by the the investigations that are being conducted, it is very similar to what we experienced at fort bragg in the late '90s where we were wrongfully tolerating extremists in our organization w
of the united states? i find that shameful, sir. >> my title is general after 32 years of military service. >> i apologize. >> -- wounded in action i'm offended by your deliberate marginalization of my viewpoint and let me know what to say -- >> i was quoting you, sir, are those not quotes? are the quotes, yes or no? >> i'm offended by your language. >> you are offended by your quotes? >> let me go on to respond -- >> what part of your quotes of and you? >> are you going to let me answer? >> i have five minutes i can do whatever i wish. so, go ahead. i want to know are you offended by your quotes? i was quoting you. >> if you're asking me if i think the cubans are a national security threat to the united states my answer is if you ask for the top 20 national security threats they wouldn't be among them. now, my actual viewpoint, however, is that u.s. national interest will be better served by lifting the travel ban, by engaging in diplomatic contact with them and indeed -- >> my specific questions were asking you whether you do not feel that our security would be at any risk by your quotes sayin
missions to the united states in 1926, he committed an act of violence, and attempted murder in los angeles and was incarcerated in san quentin prison. this becomes a very crucial question as to the veracity of his famous book, "our of the night," in 1941, when eventually appears. immediately it had the following effect on him: krebbs became one of the editors and contributors to the san quentin prisoners magazine. he took lots of extension courses in writing from the university of california and at that point he determined to become a writer. he got all of san quentin in 1929, was deported, went back to europe and got caught up again and communist activities. according to him, he was thrown into jail by the nazis from which he escaped by the following routt: he converted to nazism, the nazis let him out so he could go out and be as it were a double agent for his former communist allies. they, however, didn't think there was anything phony about his -- about his conversion. and under these circumstances, he said he chased by the secret police, both of russia and of germany. he took off wi
the last eight years united states has become cuba's principal food supply year and fifth largest trading partner, but americans cannot walk our streets or shop with our people. only recently we celebrated the 20th anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall. it should be recalled that the iron curtain started to open up by millions of westerners visiting the country's. we are grateful to the politicians who carried out the policy that helped create the conditions for this peaceful outcome. americans played a significant role. today you have a similar opportunity regarding cuba. we are aware of the concern of many distinguished congress women and men of the financial the impact of american tourism on the cuban economy, fearing that the civility of giving birth to the totalitarian regime we believe that many thousands of americans visiting cuba would benefit our society and enhance our people. firstly through the free flow of ideas and further asking the government to open up and provide goods and services such as renting rooms because the capacities in the hotels would be surpassed. it wou
be said you would save for a man who combined a career as commander in chief of the united states army, and that was how congress does it made him commander in chief with his second existence as agent 13 in the spanish secret service. 11 years he commanded the nations forces, he dowson its forces, patrolled its frontiers and for most of that time, he also said america's military secrets to the largest power in the hemisphere. and if spain had acted a little more vigorously on the warnings of agent passed on they would have carried the lewis and clark expedition and put a halt to the expedition. and they did heed his advice about fortifying the border with texas and so they kept the united states out of texas for about a generation things to his warnings he was a pretty effective agent it has to be said. and then there is also his reputation as the man who founded the spanish conspiracy, and the spanish conspiracy was designed to split away kentucky and tennessee from the rest of the country. so a guy like that, you know, he makes snakes seem like a model of rectitude and chameleons, ch
who combined a career as commander in chief of the united states army and that's how congress designated him commander in chief with his second existence as agent 13 in the spanish secret service. 11 years he commanded the nation's forces. he garrisoned its forts and patrolled the forests. and at the same time he fed the military secrets to the largest power in the hemisphere and if spain had acted a little more vigorously on the warnings that agent 13 passed on they would have captured the lewis and clark expedition and put a halt to their westward exploration. and they did heed his advice about fortifying the border with texas and so they kept the united states out of texas for about a generation thanks to his warning. so he was a pretty effective agent. it has to be said. and then there's also his reputation as the man who founded the spanish conspiracy and the spanish conspiracy was designed to split away kentucky and tennessee from the rest of the country. so a guy like that, you know, he really makes sort of snakes seem like a model of good and chameleons look good compa
there were any number of african-americans who served in the congress of these united states, served in the united states senate. served in executive offices. do you even recall that in 1852:frederick douglass was actually nominated on a ticket to be vice president of the united states? and then, in 1901 there was this speech, i can't remember the member's name, who was the last african-american to serve and then there was a gulf of some 30 long years without vigilance. without a commitment, great progress that has been worked for can be eroded and erased. and we have to keep in mind as we think about tomorrow, the powerful lessons of history. the powerful lessons of history. i want to say this about public policy. the purpose in getting people elected to office is so they can make a difference. not so that they can have m. c. behind their name. not because they can do an occasional television interview. the purpose for getting elected to public office is not to just be there. the purpose is to work to make a difference. and that difference manifests itself in the design and implemen
and that lyndon johnson was president of the united states. my secret service manual tells me to protect the president of the united states and that was lyndon johnson. you stay with kennedy and i'm going to johnson. so he goes and -- his the first person to give a report to lyndon johnson. robert made up his mind that kennedy is dead but when he sees johnson that isn't what he says. what he says to johnson he says i have seen the president's wounds and i don't think he can survive. and johnson says i need more information. i want to hear from kennedy o'donnell who was appointed secretary in fact the sort of chief of staff for the kennedy white house. and he wants to hear from president kennedy's secret service agent. so emory roberts leaves the room and as he leaves the room he runs into who had arrived at hospital late and didn't see anything that happened and he says to roberts have you seen what is the president's condition and he says very matter-of-factly the president is dead and leader roberts told him johnson didn't know what i knew just kennedy was dead. the next person that co
be a good idea to admit the deposed and ailing shah of iran, to the united states for medical treatment. well, two weeks later we found ourselves in the embassy behind a steel door on the second floor of the old chancellor ri, the dearly-beloved henderson high that some of you may remember. and on the other side banging on the, banging on the door were this group of unhappy, unhappy iranians. well, it befell to me to -- having made one of probably the worst decisions of my foreign service career -- to go out from that door, to go out from behind the door and attempt, and i use this word with some trepidation, to negotiate with this, with this crowd to see if there was something we could do. maybe we could get them out or at least delay them because what was very clear to us already was that there was, we were on our own. that if anything was going to be done, we had to do it. we had made calls to the iranian government at the time or at least what passed for the iranian government, something called the provisional government of iran. and it was very clear from that contact that there wa
.s. secretary of state, secretary of war, and finally, to term president of the united states, the fifth president. as governor of virginia he became the second most powerful figure in america. virginia then was america's largest, wealthiest and heavily populated state with 20% of the american population. it stretched all the way to the mississippi river and all the way north to the great lakes. it was enormous and the prestige and its importance of the governor was akin to the governors of california, illinois, new york and texas put together. and monroe was not only governor of america's most important state, he was a national hero in the revolutionary war. in other words he was a giant in his day and i don't understand why historians ignore him which is why i wrote this book to restore him to his rightful place in american history as the most important president in the early days of the nation. now some historians elevate john adams to historical prominence and most historians deify thomas jefferson and james madison and these were three great founding fathers and great political phil
of israelis and palestinians to live in peace and security. it is also in the interest of the united states. it is urgently needed. the president knows that achieving this goal will be difficult, but he also has said that he will not weaver and his persistent pursuit of comprehensive peace in the middle east. for that reason, he has dedicated himself and his administration to the resumption of israeli-palestinian negotiations and to the creation of an atmosphere that maximizes the prospects for success. to be clear, the steps we have suggested to all parties -- israel, the palestinians, and the arab states -- to improve the atmosphere for negotiations are not ends to themselves, and they certainly are not preconditions to negotiations. but they can make a valuable contribution toward achieving our goal of successful negotiations that result in a two-state solution. that's why we've urged the palestinians to expand and improve their security efforts and to take strong and meaningful action on incitement. it's why we have urged the arab states to take steps toward normalization of relations w
to become more democratic, and in that way, not one has chosen to adopt the united states system, and we should ask why. because it does not provide the same kind of representation. i do believe we should have proportional representation and if we don't get there yet, joyce surmising voting systems or combination thereof because for example how many saab the front page of "the new york times" where they talked about new york city had a runoff election and in a city of almost 8 million people almost nobody showed up to vote. 3 million registered democrats than you had some districts were actually nobody came to vote. we can do better than this, so maybe, and i would start i believe we should start looking at things like the electoral college which are anachronistic now and i know those might be fighting wars here but i would be happy to engage in think about how we want to improve our system. our system was great maybe for the 18th century but were now in the 21st century and there have been kinds of systems the pies that can be applied they can do things, make the electoral system more r
gordon wood presents a history of the united states from 1789 to the end of the war of 1812. he writes that founders of the national government disliked the idea political parties and wish to see the demise of slavery in the north. at the redwood library in newport rhode island, is an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] thank you very much. it is a pleasure to be back here in this magnificent building. 18th century library, which i think is one of the architectural marvels of the united states and everybody should come here to see it. i am delighted to be back here again. this book which is a big fat book, can be used as a doorstop if you decide not to read it. it will work that way. the title of the book comes from a statement of jefferson turkey referred to united states, jefferson being the most expansive mind of president in history. he referred to united states that he was present up as an empire of liberty. different kind of empire is what he saw. and he as i said had great visions for the growth of this united states. i have introduced this book with a little brief description of ri
in congress. i believe in the united states. don't get me started on that. but i believe you have power that others of us don't and that's why we elect you to this office. as a constituent with six grandchildren, i'm asking you to please help the youth of our day now and the future football players of tomorrow to stay safe. call it an osha deal, call it anything you want. but they go from being our youth in america to our employees. and we have, i believe, as americans, an obligation to make this a safer sport. >> i appreciate that. the last comment, mr. chairman, as i mentioned, you're not the only person, grant you, i have 7.5 and four kids and i think it's the parents role at the very early age to take care of the safety of their children. i certainly don't think the federal government has a role in intervene in that. but congress may have a role in making sure that there may be some funds for research and development. but getting involved in the every day operation of an nfl football team, congress is not qualified to do that. maybe we should do -- stick to what we know best. with t
to moderate the international market for the benefit of the reduces and consumers. america, the united states is one of our major trading partners. we supply an essential part of the oil in the united states. of course, a little oil also goes to europe, so half and half, europe and north america. and finally to other various trading arrangements. we believe that the current market situation is one that has to be handled with such a mind of delicacy because in the process of recovery and intel it's fully recovered, we will have to be careful how much oil we put in the market retries if we're not careful then it could try the prices very low, like they went as low as $30 a barrel at the height of the economic problems the world experienced over the past year or so. we are hopeful that the recovery of the national oil will continue. in which case, we will be able to reduce an export more. we have, i'm sure you have heard about the recent problems in nigeria, which resulted in serious demolition of our capacity to produce and damage to our oil infrastructure. but with the recent fortune and occur
governance. in other words, what is the role of the united states as a very significant shareholder in general motors. we're not looking at it from the auto industry but across the institution where we have a significant interest and what role the united states is playing in the management of those companies. the united states is the government the obama administration stated repeatedly that it wants to have the board run the company the way they deem appropriate and that's obviously a policy balance against the concerns raised by you which is taxpayer money being used to fund opal and make sure europeans maintain their jobs. we're going to do an audit product that really takes a look at what the obama administration has said its role is going to be and compare to what's actually happened and see how those match up and come up with some ideas and recommendations going forward. so we're going to take a look from an audit perspective but it's important to remember that when this money was invested, whether it was with general motors or citi or in the capital purchase program, differen
is over. it's over. three big revolutions are happening in the united states today. first, we've got a new demography and that revolution is a racial revolution. when the real majority was in full swing, nine out of ten voters in this country where whites. in 2004, that was 77% of the electorate which is one of the reasons i tell my friend mark shields watch that number, it's declining. and of course it declined even more in 2008 to 74%. partly because we have the first african-american run for president in barack obama. but that number was going to decline any way. why? because by 2042, whites are going to be a minority throughout the united states. by 2042, the census bureau a few years ago estimated 2050. they revamped that estimation out to 2042 and as a parent of a 20-year-old i think about what country she is living in. and i see it's already in the schools that she does do. because in our schools, she is a minority, being white. what's going on? immigration is going on. we have more foreign-born living in the state of california today than there are people in new jersey. okay. there
in the united states of america. a very audacious objective with brilliantly executed jeans. she then spent the rest of her life trying to convince the local governments miami-dade county and miami beach to develop the ordinances and other necessary legal mechanisms to protect this a national historic district. unfortunately she died three years before the full realization of her ever. but now there is a st. i believe it is tenth st. which is named for barber. eyesight her because she is the kind of person and that i believe all americans can be if they have a sufficient amount of internal self-confidence and a willingness to acquire the competencies' to be an effective citizen. this book, it "america the owner's manual" is devoted to preparing all americans for active and effective and honorable citizenship. i have defined and in this is totally my doing, but what are the 10 essentials skills of effective citizenship? barbara had most of those skills. she had the skills through her experience in marketing with a knowing the customer and how to influence the customer because of her backgrou
, we have a very robust in my views, very good work. we are not looking to the united states or europe for crude oil. we are looking more towards india and china and developing countries of africa. in the rate of growth for china has come out very strongly. so has india to a point. and this is where the incremental divide is going to come from, not from the united states or western europe. and this recovery continues, we think we should be able to sell as much oil as we are selling now. and if it is a bonus and a growth in europe and north studl amounts, then there may be room for some more incremented in the quantity of oil that we put back. at the moment, i don't see that as such a likelihood, but what i said was in the event of the international market calling for oil in order to keep prices within reasonable level and we are ready to put more out. [inaudible]
, virtually every single member of this body in the united states senate is a member of the baby boom generation. as in my view a generation of americans, i was born in the last year of that generation, given more opportunity than any generation of people in the history of this planet because our grandparents and our parents were willing to make hard choices, understanding that part of our national creed, part of our legacy is assuring that we're expanding opportunity for those that come after us. we are having this health care debate at a moment in our country's history beset by incredible economic difficulties. this is the worst recession since the great depression. but we now know that even during the period of economic growth before our economy fell into this terrible recession, that powg families were struggling. during the last period of economic growth, median family income in the united states actually declined. as far as i know, it's the first period of recovery in the history of the united states when median family income actually went down, and that was at the same time tha
had a choice, go back to boss the kneia, or end up in the united states. they went to chicago. >> that's when i finally felt like you can enjoy life now, we've made it. you can relax now. you know, it's yours, so, you know, i always, like, wanted to have a house i could have friends over and stuff, and every day, like, since we had the house, i always have people over, there's not like one day where my mom is not cooking for everyone. but in bosnia, it's just like that. you always have family over, friends over, you're grilling. >> reporter: and from there, life was good. boggio starred in soccer, and now he's getting plenty of playing time for the fire. >> i can't really describe like how you feel, like -- because you, like, you remember, when you go back, it all comes back to you like everything happened yesterday, and its just like, you know, it's -- you try to make it happy where you get to see your family again, but as soon as like that goes away, like, wow, like i left all of this behind. what if i didn't have this sort of future? >> reporter: and so you can understand when the
, the united states has been using a base technology to create vaccine. while it is safe and effective, it's a slow-moving process. across europe, vaccine developers are using the faster process of incorporating the million sales to grow the vaccine. as we begin to explore cell-based technology, i would pose the question will there be an adequate fda approval for this new vaccine? i'm also interested in hearing in the vaccine manufacturers from how they ramped up reduction in some cases to ten times their normal production schedule. we know that production of a delayed for h1n1, a harmful but relatively moderate virus compared to something more lethal like the spanish flu. but in the case of a stronger virus, the higher fatality rate, what our country be able to produce enough vaccine for everyone in a short time. here it so i look forward to questioning the witnesses, welcome them again, learning more about how we can improve vaccine reduction in our country and again thank the chairman for this joint an important hearing. i yield back. >> thank you ms. eshoo. gentleman from pennsylvania,
year in the united states congress and i am privileged to be able to sit on the financial services committee. and who would've known that for the last two, three years that financial services committee would be the center of the universe when it comes to taking a look at what's happening with the economic meltdown that so many americans have had to deal with and look at. joining me today is an author of a great new book that i know everyone will be interested in, it's called "architects of ruin." and the author is mr. peter schweizer. he will join us today to talk a little bit about what happened with the economic meltdown, how did we get here, who are the key players, what are we going to do and how do we get out so we can get back into prosperity. peter, i want to thank you for joining me today. and for booktv. so let's talk a bit about your book, "architects of ruin." how long has been a? >> just a couple of weeks. >> what have you been hearing from people so far? >> it's interesting to a lot of people reaction, a lot of people were surprised with the information in the book. i
and lyndon johnson was president of the united states and he says my secret service pan you'll tells me to protect the president of the united states, and that was johnson. so he goes into -- he's the first person to give a report to lyndon johnson. now, roberts has already made up his mind that kennedy is dead and johnson is present, but with he sees johnson that's not what he says. what he says to johnson, he says, i have seen the president's wounds and i don't think he can survive. and johnson says, i need more information, i want to hear from kenny o'donnell, who was -- his title was appointment secretary, he was in fact, sort of chief of he staff for the kennedy white house, and he wants to hear from roy kellerman, who was president kennedy's secret service agent, so emmy roberts leaves the room. he runs into lem johns, who is another secret service agent, who had arrived at the hospital late and says to roberts, have you seen -- what's the president's condition? and he says very matter of factually, the president is dead and later, roberts told william manchester, he said, johnson
transforming the united states of america. and he also had a record powerfully indicating that he would pursue policies dangers to the security of israel. because of all this, i hoped for a while that my fellow jews would finally break free of the liberalism to which they have remained enthralled, long past the point where it has served either their interest over their ideals, whether as a jews or as americans. that hope having been so resoundingly dashed on election day, i never asked for a bit of encouragement from the signs that buyer's remorse may be beginning to set in among jews. as it also seems to be doing among the independents who voted for obama. and so i am now hoping against hope, that the exposure of obama as a false messiahs will at last open the eyes of my fellow jews to the co-relative falsity of the political creed that he so perfectly personifies and into which so many of them have for so long been so misguidedly loyal. thank you very much. [applause] >> before we start the questions and answers, i'm a study that immediately following his presentation at 4:00, mr. podhoretz
that i've had for a long time. particularly because i taught for five years at the united states military academy. and raised a in that amount, five years of young leaders who served in iraq, who have also served in afghanistan, and who have made an important contribution to the military of the nation. >> host: absolutely. i'm sure you've seen many of them. >> i have to say it's the most humbling and exciting experience to go into a theater of war and to see someone who you last saw as young cadet in command of soldiers. in fact, i had quite an experience going to visit a very good student, someone whom i had mentored very closely in may 2007 when he was commanding a company in southern baghdad. and i have to say, to see him in command, was as i said, one of the most humbling experiences. it really is unusual for a civilian to be able to see the fruits of teaching officership. >> host: right in the heart of it, southern baghdad. we will get to that. i think in reading this book, if i was a casual observer, i would still have no idea the extent to which you yourself were involved in the su
mr. tennant was, who did we have on the ground that was responsible directly to the united states of america to verify this information? if we knew the street addresses and have pictures and prices somebody ought to be able to go and look in the window are not on the door and see what is on the other side. how many people did the united states have been a country of about 30 million people to verify these 550 places, the answer was zero. so we were totally reliant on this group of highly conflicted exiles. that was all i needed to hear to have serious doubts at the validity of this information upon which we ultimately went to war with, i think, disaster consequence. .. >> if people are trying to get involved and they see that this government seems broken and does not work they get cynical said on top of that asking about "the new york times" max wrangle said he is not read about the existence of that but the newspapers in the country and of those go down they will learn of local problems to get them involved so how the system seems not to be working and the decline of the press wh
. bangladesh is a country of 1 sixty million people, half that of the united states. a three foot rise in sea level would put a good part of the become dulled the beneath the sea. that produces half of the rice for vietnam. a country of eighty million people and the country that is the world's second rising rice exporter after thailand. others will be affected in varying degrees by rising sea level. imagine ice melting in the far north atlantic will shrink the rice harvest of asia. but this is not the most serious threat. that is coming from melting mountain glaciers. the glacier monitoring institute in switzerland has now reported the eighteenth consecutive year of shrinking mountain glaciers around the world. they monitor glaciers in the andes and the rocky mountains, the alps, the himalayas, the tibetan plateau and they're reporting glaciers are melting everywhere. it is the ice melts from the glaciers in the himalayas and on the tibetan plateau that sustains the major rivers of asia during the dry season. it is that i smelled that sustains the rivers that also sustains the irrigation syst
to not come from the south of the united states or they tend to be refugees from the south. jackie robinson away from georgia to pasadena california, or curt flood who came from oakland california. i was just talking to someone about that the other day the way that when marvin miller was looking for someone to challenge, he was looking for an african-american athlete not from the south but was influenced by the broad tenor of the times. it seems sugar ray robinson was very influenced by what it meant to live in harlem at the time. and harlem is in many ways a character in the story. and people should know that this is not a typical biography. it is certainly not a typical sports biography. you have marvelous personifications of harlem, jazz music and "esquire" magazine and the in affect become characters in the story. why is it important to understand harlem to understand sugar ray robinson? >> guest: people always say a statement, people always say he had such style or she had such style, well what does that mean? i was intrigued with that. >> host: what is style? >> guest: yeah, what is s
of the united states. isn't my secret service manual tells me to protect the president of the united states, and that was lyndon johnson. he says you stay with kennedy. i'm going to johnson. so he goes in -- is the first person to give a report to lyndon johnson. roberts has made up his mind that kennedy is dead and johnson is president. when he sees johnson that's not what he says that his first report to johnson he says i have seen the president went and i don't think he can survive. johnson says i need more information i want to hear from kenny o'donnell who was out, his chief of staff for the kennedy white house. he wants to hear from kellerman who was president kennedy's secret service agent. the emery roberts leads the room, he runs into lemma roberts who is another secret service agent. who had arrived at the hospital he ended the anything. he says have you seen -- what's the present condition? he says very matter-of-factly the president is dead. later, roberts called manchester and saint john's didn't know what i do, which is that kennedy was dead. inexpertly comes in its ellerman.
know that the president of the united states will make a policy choice. but let's face it, president obama probably doesn't know a lot about iran, so he is going to turn to his advisors he's got. the secretary of state, he has national security adviser, he has the secretary of defense. he has a secretary of energy and so forth. he's going to turn to these people and ask, what do you think we should do about iran? what would be the effective strategy? and let's face it, stephen hsu is a very, very, very smart man. he used to be my next-door neighbor. i babysat for his children. he's got a nobel prize in physics. he knows about particle interacting. he does not know a lot about people interacting strategically and he probably doesn't know much about iran. hillary clinton operably doesn't know that much about iran either. so they have advisors, date turn to their advisors who do know about iran, about energy policy, about nuclear development and so forth. and those people may exert a great deal of influence in what bubbles up to be the recommendations that the president receives and tha
measure before the united states senate in which no member on this side of the aisle has been consulted in any way -- i would point out to my colleagues historically there has never been a major reform implemented by the congress of the united states unless it's by a -- unless it's bipartisan in nature and i don't believe that the american people want this 2,000-and-some-page monstrosity, which is full of -- which is full of all kinds of provisions that they are either unaware of or even in the study of this legislation many of us have also become unaware of. but fundamentally the bernie madoff accounting, the enron accounting that's been going on with this bill is dependent on envisioning a half a traldz in cuts -- half a trillion dollars in cuts are not attainable. if they are attainable, it would mean a curtailment or reduction in what we promised the senior citizens of this country. it's not acceptable. so what this -- what this -- this motion to commit does, it sends it back to the finance committee. come back with another bill. only this time don't put the cost of it on the backs
. you know, we all grow up under the smith that anyone can run and be president of the united states, right? this is the national lower. but if you try to beat anyone and you are not the party favorite of one of the two major parties, wrote to you. it is nearly impossible to run an effect did national presidential campaign out side of the two parties this time and that's because we have systemic barriers, and even if you have a supremely qualified candidates, even if you have popular support. we have systemic barriers that have made it difficult to compete. and there is no level playing field. so when jim bennett writes in his book, the system is rigged and nobody cares, i know what do he speaks. let's start with ballot access. well, actually let's start with the regulatory system. if you haven't had the pleasure of reading 11 cfr, the code of federal regulations for campaign finance, i suggest you do so. as one person i interviewed at the campaign election it was i said i am a lawyer, i'll be able to figure this out. and he said well know, it's really like asking a general practitio
. governing magazine rates utah and virginia as having two of the best run governments in the united states. you tell me whether you think virginia government or utah state government, are they somehow much more corrupt than the federal government, the federal system? most people in the state would tell you did think that probably have a cleaner government than the federal system. >> i promised the gentleman behind christina. >> thank you. my name is karen rose. i live in seattle washington. one question was just asked. i want to go back to the question. i voted for ralph nader, and i am still repenting for that sin. >> i hope that this tongue in cheek. >> the question about voter turnout. very ms. is there a correlationn an increase of voter turnout and support for the third party and from the campaign finance reform purses the lower turnout? other than every four years high-profile election voter turnout in the united states is very, very low. i just went out to dr. bennett's point, he mentions a wrong which is a good example. i believe in afghanistan had 28 candidates on their ballots in
to the document that a lot of people to not put could credence into the constitution of the united states and ask what does this say about political parties? the answer is nothing, however in the debate are patriot such as james madison and benjamin franklin and so one, a great deal was said about the notion of faction. faction in today's terminology is special interest and parties were considered to be special interest who wanted to use the power of the state to benefit themselves and their members. even two-day surveys have shown throughout the world, a deep public distrust of political parties ever wear wear -- everywhere. pulling parties are ranked lower than owe boyer's. yes. will were. that tells you something we have political parties and by the end of the civil war it said democrats and republicans were entrenched as the two major parties a duopoly controlling politics. how did this occur? there is a number of reasons. i have four reasons. first come with the elimination of multi member districts. at-large elections were sharply restrict should buy the apportionment act that require congr
. he was a fifth generation mary landrieu who served as a commanding general of the united states army for many years and was the first governor of louisiana territory in 1805. he became a secret agent of the spanish government in 1787, and was called agent number 13. he was a double agent over 30 years. general wilkinson died in mexico city in 1825 working for the mexican government. in the one short year that wilkinson was governor of louisiana territory in 1805, he created a lot of chaos over corrupt land deals. he was a co-conspirator with aaron burr in the 1806 attempt to invade mexico. but he betrayed burr and saved himself. at birth was indicted for treason and wilkinson narrowly escaped indictment. merriweather lewis was present at birth trial, for treason, after he returned from the expedition. lewis served as jefferson's eyes and ears at the trial and report back to him. windlass accepted the position of governor of louisiana territory, his first responsibility was to root out suspected burr writes from position of power and influence. ehrenberg brother-in-law, joseph brown,
do we do? what do we do to create financial institutions that are part of the united states of america that don't live behind a wall of greed and selfishness and irresponsibility and the illegal behavior? what do we do to have financial is titian's play a role in providing credit so that the entrepreneurs and business people can create real goods and services and create meaningful jobs? what would you suggest we do? >> guest: first of all we have to look at the money given to the system because we didn't put, the government didn't put any strings attached to it. we have to start to attach some strings and say do you know what? he said he were going to loosen credit and you didn't. here is what you need to do. you need to take a portion of their capital and there's all this discussion now and there should be about things having more capital so they can actually control it so the government does have to come in and subsidize it but at the same time some of that should be divided out and more capital should be given to small businesses and more capital should be made available
, to promote innovation and thereby promote global competitiveness of the united states. three, to promote competition because that's how we'll get the most innovation and investment. and fourth, to protect and empower consumers. >> host: well, before we get into some specific issues, there are two things that i've noticed from reading your speeches. number one, the use of the word ecosystem. [laughter] and the use of the word robust. could you talk about those a little bit? >> guest: it's interesting that you've noticed those because i don't think i did that deliberately, but on ecosystem, it's an important concept because there are so many different pieces of this communication landscape, our communications infrastructure. take our networks, our kind of wired networks over which communications travel or our wireless networks too. we need ongoing investment in those networks, we need those networks to get more robust, we need them to get smarter. there's been literally billions of dollars of private investment in those networks over the last number of years. that is essential, and it's es
. and the official betting parlor for the obermeyer and the rehnquist was the chief justice of the united states. and it was -- that was it. on the afternoon before the election, he predicted and changed his long hand bet that george w. bush would both out gore by an elect form margin of 320-218. he earlier in the day picked 305-320, much closer. his long hand betting card, then 10 days after the bet, he sent me a letter on supreme court stationery, one of the few formal letters i ever received, asking to be excused from a $1 bet, because, and i'm going to quote, it is remotely possible that the florida election case might come to our court. i will point out to you that the long hand betting card with the corrections and the letter are reproduced in my book. i think one of the more interesting parts of it. i also explained why he believed that he and his colleagues acted couragely and patriotically when they decided twice to get involved in the bush-gore disputed elections. he knew that taking on the case would be a thankless assignment, regardless of which candidate won, the justices would be v
. live coverage on c-span2. a rare saturday session of the united states senate. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the chaplain dr. barry black will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. o shepherd who neither slumbers or sleeps, as we labor this weekend, we desire you to be near to guide us with your wisdom and love. use our lawmakers as instrument of your providence, leading them beside still waters, restoring their energy, and bringing them to your desired destination. give them the stature to see above the walls of prideful opinions the path to the greatest good. lord, sustain them with your strength, preserve them with your grace. instruct them with your wisdom, and protect them with your power. as an intentional act of will, may they commit to you everything they think, say, and do today. we pray in your sovereign name. amen. the presiding officer: please join me in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivi
a little bit about the united states signing the copenhagen document at the helsinki accords, which talks about political freedoms that require a clear separation between the state and political parties. yeah, right. and the signatories agreed to respect the right of citizens to seek a political or public office individually or as a representative political parties without discrimination. yeah, right. well, as i mentioned before, have hocrisy is not a serious problem when it comes to politics. and i would just know by the way that in iran in the last presidential election, they had some seven candidates and of course pointing a finger at us as the weight we do things. in my book i discuss in some detail the role of the third party and independent and a 2008 election. and more accurately, they're almost unfortunate non-role in that election. and i briefly surveyed how other developed countries hold elections that it's sufficient to say that edward parties are increasingly common part of the apparatus of the state through subsidies. however, ballot access laws are typically nowhere near as
. have been to congress will then, there was disparity in home ownership in lending in the united states parkway broke down between the ethnic minorities and other american is. >> host: that was redlining. >> guest: the argument was the reason we had the gap is because banks are racially discriminating against hispanics and african-americans. the problem with the very as there is not much evidence to support it. when you look at the data, you find black owned banks had a worse lending record to minority communities it was not on racial grounds. >> host: is that because they did not have sufficient money? >> guest: because unfortunately those committees 10 to have more problems with credit. the federal reserve has done studies that show white americans 21% have bad credits they have defaulted or declared bankruptcy but within african-american and hispanic it is more than twice the level. the problem is you have credit issues but the activist ignore that and they said this is about racism and racial discrimination in. in order to close the gap we will reduce lending standards and force the
or protecting any party but the two major parties in the united states today we should also say that third parties in other countries are associated with systems of representation. those systems we can see the classical liberalism has a purer form. .. >> he is the director of the olin institute for employment practice and policy and received his ph.d. from case western reserve 1970 and specializing in research public policy issues, economics of government bureaucracy, labor unions and health charities. founder and editor of general research and has published more than 60 articles such as the american economic review, public choice and others. he has written many books. he is the author of destroying democracy. published by the cato institute in 1986. please welcome jim bennett, our author today. [applause] >> thank you john. thank you to our house that kato who was a little surprised that ralph nader had written a forward to this book. my credentials sudden they crumble. [laughter] but that is all right. at the after words was a written by a fed chairman of the libertarian committees allia
of the united states tomorrow. with that, thank you for being here. welcome to today. i hope you get a lot out of today. it's my pleasure, now, to introduce the first of two co-chairmen of the american council on renewable energy. john geeseman was the executive directer the beginning of his career, spence 19 years then in finance, came back as the commissioner of the california energy commission and is given credit for much of the policies of the state of california that's the lead of our country. please welcome, john geesman. [applause] >> i bring you greetings from the west coast. as historians look across the last several decades, our national energy policy they're likely to find common patterns no matter which party is in power. abdicated responsibilities, squandered opportunities, willful avoidance of unpleasant realities. recently, that's started to change. whether we recognize it or not, there is a race underway. most of the major economies of the world are striving to radically expand the size of their domestic renewable energy markets in order to gain competitive advantage in the gre
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